CST to Award Cobb Honorary Doctorate at Commencement


Friday, February 15, 2013 at 10:15AM

CST to Award Cobb Honorary Doctorate at Commencement CST will award an honorary doctorate to renowned American theologian and United Methodist John B. Cobb, Jr., Ph.D. at its 2013 Commencement.

Tuesday, May 21, 2013, at 9 a.m.
Chapel Lawn

Claremont School of Theology will award an honorary doctorate to renowned American theologian and United Methodist John B. Cobb, Jr., Ph.D. at its 2013 Commencement. A preeminent process theologian, Cobb has been a major inspiration to Claremont students, alumni/ae, and colleagues through the years, as well as to thousands of international scholars, leaders, and laypeople, especially in China.

The School of Theology will honor Dr. Cobb in a combined Commencement with Claremont Lincoln University. The other speaker for the ceremony will be the Claremont Lincoln honoree, popular speaker and author Eboo Patel, Ph.D. President of the Interfaith Youth Core.

A prolific and sought-after author and speaker, Dr. Cobb has written, co-written, or edited more than 50 books, including Christ in a Pluralistic Age, God and the World, and For the Common Good (with Herman Daly), which was co-winner of the Grawemeyer Award for Ideas Improving World Order.

He has held many prestigious positions including Ingraham Professor of Theology at Claremont School of Theology, Avery Professor at the Claremont Graduate School, Fullbright Professor at the University of Mainz, and Visiting Professor at Vanderbilt, Harvard, and Chicago Divinity Schools. He has pioneered a theology that is both Christocentric as well as accepting in its approach to other faiths, and includes ecological concerns as an essential and interrelated part of that theology, for the sake of future generations.

Born in Kobe, Japan to Methodist missionary parents, Dr. Cobb studied at University of Chicago Divinity School with Charles Hartshorne, who taught him Whiteheadian metaphysics and philosophy in a theological context, which would later become known as Process Theology. He went on to receive his M.A. and Ph.D. from University of Chicago. He taught at Candler School of Theology, Emory University, until 1958 when he moved to Claremont School of Theology, where he stayed until his retirement in 1990. He continues to be actively involved with CST, Claremont Lincoln University, and the Center for Process Studies, including its China Project.


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